Plates 9, 5, 13 10, 7, 16: Assorted Sketches from Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal Hibernians by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Plates 9, 5, 13, 10, 7, 16: Assorted Sketches from Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology
of the Aboriginal Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.


Pen and marker on card
A4

Shaman


…Upon entering what could only be described by the most charitable observer as a building, I
encountered a being of such peculiar appearance as to leave me positively aghast. Seated in the
midst of the most pronounced squalor sat a woman barely five feet in height, displaying in her visage
every sign of old age. My guide informed me with the utmost gravity that this venerable creature
was in fact the settlement’s spiritual guide, a shaman of sorts, who through the use of various
psychotropic substances, the names of which I will not inflict on the delicate sensibilities of my
readers, would enter an altered mental state in which she would commune with the various deities
which this much superstitious people are wont to accumulate. Despite her aged appearance, my
guide assured me that the woman was no more than thirty-five, having been aged prematurely by
her occupation, though in truth I can assure the reader that thirty-five is well beyond the average
age to which the native Hibernians are known to attain…

Excerpt from Page 52 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Chieftain


…My stay with the Big Forest West tribe proved to be a most fortuitous one. After much
remonstration with my faithful guide, I was finally able to prevail upon him to arrange for me a
meeting with one of the local dignitaries, one Aymo of the Towers of Crom (a local war god, I
believe). I had been reliably informed that this gentleman, a warlord of sorts, was currently serving
in the capacity of chieftain of the Big Forest West tribe, having inherited the position following the
untimely death of the previous incumbent, Steevo of Old Tribe. On further investigation, I discovered
that the change in governance had been far from a peaceful one; indeed the current chieftain had
brutally murdered his predecessor. I expressed my alarm to my guide at this troubling discovery, but
was reliably informed that such a procedure was quite the norm among the Hibernian tribes. In
order to maintain their position of authority, tribal leaders are required to be men of both strength,
cunning and ruthless efficiency. I was assured that order could be maintained only once a chieftain
was viewed by his subordinates with a mixture of respect and terror. Frequently such men are short-
lived; few die of natural causes…

Excerpt from Page 28 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Gallowglass


…My observations have led me to conclude that the military structure of the Hibernian tribal armies
is dominated by two distinct classes of warrior. The first of these are the gallowglasses, the elite
troops of a Hibernian chieftain’s war-band. I could garner little information about the origins of
these men, as the local populace were loth to speak of them for fear of some unspecified
retribution. Indeed, my guide strictly forbade me from approaching these men myself, saying that I
should do so at the forfeit of my life. By all accounts these gallowglasses strike a very imposing
figure, being much larger in stature than any of the local inhabitants. Whether this be by a variance
in diet, a specialised regimen of exercise, or by some chemical means I know not. What I could
ascertain for a certainty was that they are mercenaries, paid by their lords in plunder from raids
either within the Hibernian territories or farther afield in the domains of Albion, Cambria or
Caledonia…

Excerpt from Page 112 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Trader


…Among the most despised of the denizens of the Hibernian wastes is the merchant trader,
individuals about whom my loyal guide would vituperate for hours on end. Generally regarded as the
most corrupt, venal and exploitative of personages, the merchant traders of Hibernia travel from
settlement to settlement, selling their goods and chattels at the most exorbitant of prices. They also
have a hand in regulating the trade between the Hibernian tribes and those of their neighbours in
Albion, Cambria and Caledonia, reaping rich dividends for their role as middlemen. On enquiring into
why such individuals were tolerated by the general populace my guide informed me that the traders
are viewed as a necessary evil; for one, they are one of the few sources of information as to events
transpiring in other settlements. In addition, the wealth they accumulate lends them a certain
invulnerability. Indeed, even the chieftains rarely interfere with their activities, a notable exception
to their general policy. I myself had some dealings with these salesmen, and found them altogether
disreputable. Much of the information with which I was provided by these peddlers was unreliable in
the extreme…

Excerpt from Page 63 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Noblewoman


…My audience with the chieftain of the Big Forest West tribe reaped an unexpected dividend; I was
able through sheer luck to gain a glimpse of his hareem, and therefore to observe the peculiarities of
the women of high social standing in Hibernian society. The most striking feature of the female
companions of the Hibernian ruling classes is their unusual skin pigmentation. Amongst the
aboriginal population, the beautification of the body by colouration of the skin is seen as a mark of
distinction. Notable women coat themselves in a substance which transforms their natural paleness
to something of a brownish orange. I must own that this affectation certainly draws the eye, though
my ever vigilant guide advised me not to stare too long, as the members of the chieftain’s hareem
are noted to be just as fierce as their male counterparts. Indeed I was unable to converse with any of
these women, for fear I should overstay my welcome and attract the ire of the warlord himself…

Excerpt from Page 38 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

Kern


…The backbone of a tribal chieftain’s army is the kern, a sort of light infantryman, who stands in
sharp contrast to the heavier gallowglass mercenary. These ruffians, for that is the best description
for them, gather beneath the banner of the strongest and most brutal of their brethren, forming
bands of warriors who traverse the marshy wastelands of Hibernia, terrorising and abusing the
peasantry with impunity. From what I have observed, it seems that these formations coalesce into
the ruling order, with the will of the chieftain enforced by means of intimidation and punitive
violence, often carried out by these kern soldiers. In as much as I can make any sense of their
organisation, it seems that officers, for want of a better word, are selected by means of a ‘survival of
the fittest’ system, much like that which governs the selection of the chieftain. The kern seem to be
entirely separate from their elite counterparts, although they show the gallowglasses due deference,
lest they come to a sudden and violent end. I must say it strikes me as a marvel that any order is
maintained by the warlord among his men at all. Nonetheless the ferocity of the kern has been
remarked upon by numerous sources, and if it in any way measures up to their uncouthness of
manner and surliness of demeanour I shouldn’t be in the least surprised…

Excerpt from Page 135 of Reflections on the Society, Culture and Mythology of the Aboriginal
Hibernians
by Lady Florence Kingsley-Bird, 12th Baroness Pfeiffer.

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